Science

Torah and jad - exhibits in Big Synagogue Museum, Wlodawa - Poland. (CC BY 2.5)

The story of one famous mathematician’s obsession with the ancient and mystical and numerical world of the Kabbalah, from Shlomo Maital of the podcast "Israel Story."

Crochet hyperbolic plane (by Anitra Menning), from the "Crochet Coral Reef" project by Christine and Margaret Wertheim and the Institute For Figuring.
Air Dates:
  • March 02, 2019
  • May 05, 2018
  • October 07, 2017

For centuries, mathematicians have been looking for the deep design, the mathematical code to explain everything from microorganisms to spacetime. But it’s a dangerous quest.

An egg in a nest

Frank Wilczek is a Nobel Prize-winning physicist at MIT. He's kind of obsessed, in his own way, with understanding the universe. Specifically, he’s interested in what he calls “the beautiful question." Is the universe naturally, inherently beautiful?

Plastic crochet corals from the "Crochet Coral Reef" project by Christine and Margaret Wertheim and the Institute For Figuring.

What if the geometric structure of the universe has been hidden, for centuries, in crochet? Margaret Wertheim can help you get there with a ball of wool, a crochet hook, and some non-Euclidean geometry.

Swirls
Air Dates:
  • August 25, 2018
  • September 23, 2017
  • March 05, 2017

Psychedelic science is back — and they could help heal people with addictions, PTSD and end-of-life anxiety.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson makes the case for why constantly searching for answers doesn't have to dispel our sense of awe and wonder faced with the seemingly unknowable universe.

Searching the stars

For more than 30 years, the scientists at the SETI Institute have been looking and listening for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence. And recently, some of them decided to get a bit more proactive.

nebula

Much of the universe can't be seen, as is the case with dark matter and dark energy: the invisible stuff that, according to the laws of physics, makes up 96 percent of the universe. Yale astronomer Priya Natarajan says it is difficult–but not impossible—to find it.

Solar eclipse

Journalist David Baron describes how witnessing a total solar eclipse set him on a path to examine how eclipses have propelled many inquisitive minds deeper into the sciences to see more deeply into the universe.

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