On the Radio

Week of June 19, 2016

What's In A Name?

June 19, 2016

Your name is a collection of sounds and syllables that identify you. It's your tag, handle, label, second skin.  It's written on your birth certificate and it'll be inscribed on your grave.  But what does it actually mean?  Names carry family dreams, expectations and legacies.  In this episode, stories about the power and politics of names -- how they shape us and how we shape them.  What does your name say about you?

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  1. Me, Myself and My Name

    Your name is a set of sounds used to set you apart.  But what if your sounds are too hard for some people to say?   Parth Shah shares the first episode of "Hyphen," a podcast about people who live in two different worlds simultaneously.  In this episode, Parth explores what it's like to grow up in America with a name that some people think doesn't "sound American".

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  2. What Not To Name Your Baby

    The most popular baby names in the US last year were Noah and Emma.  We know that because 20 years ago, Michael Shackleford wrote a computer program to track the annual popularity of baby names.  Expectant parents everywhere should thank him.

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  3. The Man Who Wasn't Charles Lindbergh

    You've heard of Charles A. Lindbergh, the first pilot to cross the Atlantic. But what about Charles A. Levine?  The two men shared more than the same initials. In 1927, they were locked in a battle to make aviation history.  Lindbergh beat Levine across the Atlantic by two weeks.  Henry Sapoznik brings us the story of two planes, two songs, and two men named Charles.

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  4. The Power of Names

    What does your name say about you? Psychoanalyst Mavis Himes helps clients uncover the invisible family legacies hidden in names. She talks about what it means to truly own and inhabit your name.

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  5. Writing With Apples: A Visit To Novelist Jane Hamilton's Family Orchard

    Award-winning novelist Jane Hamilton's new novel has a setting that's close to home.  "The Excellent Lombards" is a story of generational tension set on a family apple farm.  Steve Paulson talks about writing, farming and apples with Jane while walking through her own family orchard.

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The Art of the Collection

June 19, 2016
(was 09.06.2015)

Bottle caps, coins, dolls, rocks. My Aunt Mary’s ceramic chickens. Most of us collect something. It seems to be in our genes. And for most of us it’s a fun hobby. For others, it can get a little time consuming. But for a few, collecting is a total obsession.

Amanda Petrusich is a music journalist who began investigating a story about obsessive collectors of 78rpm records. But she ended up getting a little too close to her subject. She became obsessed herself – and ended up scuba diving in the Milwaukee River, looking for the Holy Grail: a lost collection of Paramount 78s.

Where does obsessive collecting come from? And what does it mean? Lorraine Daston takes us back to 17th century Europe and the nobility’s Kunstkamera, or chambers of wonders.  They were filled with nature’s freaks and anomalies.  But these marvels, these monsters, helped give birth to modern science.

Artist Natasha Nicholson makes contemporary cabinets of curiosity, but not simply to gaze at – she lives in them. Nicholson lives inside her own museum, in highly curated rooms in an old storefront in Madison, Wisconsin.

And please, don’t forget Gary Brockman. He makes his living from his collection. Baseball cards? Stamps? Nope. Gary collects buttons. And not just any buttons, 19th century buttons.

Our final interview in today’s show has nothing to do with collecting – unless you consider winning two presidential campaigns a collection of two wins. David Axelrod was the chief strategist for Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns and recently stopped by our studio to talk about the art of running for office.

  1. How Deep is Your Love? The Mania of Collecting Takes One Journalist to the Bottom of a River

    Amanda Petrusich is a music journalist who assigned a story about obsessive collectors of 78rpm records. But she ended up getting a little too close to her subject. She became obsessed herself – and ended up scuba diving in the Milwaukee River, looking for the Holy Grail: a lost collection of Paramount 78s.

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  2. Lorraine Daston on a History of Wonders

    Where does obsessive collecting come from? And what does it mean? Lorraine Daston takes us back to 17th century Europe and the nobility’s Kunstkamera, or chambers of wonders.  They were filled with nature’s freaks and anomalies.  But these marvels, these monsters, gave birth to modern science.

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  3. Artist Natasha Nicholson Lives Inside Her Art - Literally

    Artist Natasha Nicholson makes contemporary cabinets of curiosity, but not simply to gaze at – they are her world. Nicholson lives inside her own art, highly curated rooms in an old storefront in Madison, Wisconsin.

    Her solo show that reproduces her ENTIRE studio space is at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art.

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  4. Who's Got the Button? Gary Brockman Does.

    And please, don’t forget Gary Brockman. He makes his living from his collection. Baseball cards? Stamps? Nope. Gary collects buttons. And not just any buttons, 19th century buttons.

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  5. David Axelrod on How to Run for President

    Our final interview in today’s show has nothing to do with collecting – unless you consider winning two presidential campaigns a collection of two wins. David Axelrod was the chief strategist for Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns and recently stopped by our studio to talk about the art of running for office.

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